Connecticut Historical Society

About This Collection

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A day out with the guys
A day out with the guys
Black and white film of a group of men in woolen jackets and knickers, out in the wild but acting silly, hamming for the camera, flasks of liquor, a camp fire and food. One segment has the men pretending to take off their trousers; another shows someone else using a camera. There is a gap, and then there are images of a farm and a team of horses pulling a sled. The latter part of the movie was taken in winter as there is snow on the ground.
American Revolution
American Revolution
The bulk of this collection consists of records of the Council of Safety, whose function it was to handle the day to day affairs of Connecticut's wartime government; records of the Commissary department which was responsible for providing food and equipment for the soldiers; records of the Committee of Pay-Table which paid for supplies and services; the commissary and paymaster records of the Third Regiment, Connecticut Line; orderly books, journals and correspondence describing activities of Connecticut persons during the Revolution. Not all of the manuscripts have been digitized. Additional materials are from related collections that have been suggested for use in teaching about the Revolution using primary resources. A grant from the National Historical Publications and Records Commission funded digitization of this collection., Connecticut Historical Society
Benjamin Talcott Account Book,, 1699-1725
Benjamin Talcott Account Book,, 1699-1725
Accounts kept by a blacksmith who lived in Glastonbury, Conn. He was the son of Samuel and Hannah Holyoke Talcott. Benjamin married Sarah Hollister with whom he had five children. Funds to conserve and digitize this account book were donated by members of the Talcott family and friends.
Benjamin Tallmadge letter to Reuben H. Booth
Benjamin Tallmadge letter to Reuben H. Booth
Letter from Benjmain Tallmadge in Litchfield, Connecticut, to Reuben H. Booth in Newtown, Connecticut, in which Tallmadge indicated he would ride to New London at the end of the week or the beginning of the following week to oversee the closing of a factory.
Charlotte and Samuel Cowles Correspondence, 1833-1841, 1846
Charlotte and Samuel Cowles Correspondence, 1833-1841, 1846
Correspondence between Charlotte Cowles of Farmington, Connecticut, and her brother, Samuel Cowles, of Windsor, Vermont, Boston, Massachusetts and Hartford, Connecticut. Charlotte was educated at the Farmington Academy and kept the family home after her mother's death in 1837. Her father Horace was active in abolition and temperance, as Charlotte's letters illustrate. She herself helped form a women's anti-slavery group in Farmington, she attended abolition lectures and read the literature popular at the time, her family helped slaves escape north, and Horace helped ban liquor licenses in Farmington. Charlotte's letters mention such names as Gerrit Smith, Henry Brewster Stanton, and Theodore Weld. Samuel published the anti-slavery newspaper Charter Oak in Hartford. His letters chronicle the not always friendly reception of an anti-slavery publication in that city. In 1839 there was an African slave revolt on the Schooner Amistad and the ship ended up in American waters. The slaves were brought to trial. In 1841, after the captives were declared free by the U.S. Supreme Court, they lived in Farmington, where Charlotte had ample opportunity to interact with them; in fact one of the African children lived with the Cowles. Her four letters from this time period provide insight into how the Mende Africans and the people of Farmington reacted to each other and into how a young, educated female came to understand the evils of slavery in a far deeper way than before. In addition to comments on the politics of the time, Charlotte also related news about events in Farmington and within her own household, including marriages and births, sleighing in winter, the progress of the flowers in spring, the books she read, and the comings and goings of friends and relatives., Connecticut Historical Society
Dudley Woodbridge letter to Mrs. Naughtie
Dudley Woodbridge letter to Mrs. Naughtie
Letter written from Barbados by Dudley Woodbridge, in which he reported on Mrs. Naughtie's son John Randall. Randall was in New Spain as a writer and accountant to a gentleman Woodbridge employed as an agent in the Royal Assiento Company. He reported Randall was careful and diligent and had shown improvement in English and math and was learning Spanish.
E. Spalding letter to John Warner Barber
E. Spalding letter to John Warner Barber
Letter from E. Spalding to John Warner Barber outlining the history of the settlement of the town of Brooklyn, Connecticut. Barber requested the history in preparation for his book of historical facts of each town accompanied by his sketch of the town.
Elizabeth Steele letter to her children
Elizabeth Steele letter to her children
Written over the course of several months, Elizabeth Steele, who with her husband moved to the town of Hinesburgh in western Vermont, described her daily activities, visits with neighbors, the weather, her faith in God, her loneliness, politics, boiling sap, the growth of crops, recalled the death of her son sixteen years ago and the anniversary of the deaths of other friends and family members, commented on the sound of cutting timber, and her practice of religion. She felt the area was growing well and would become an important town. The last entry was August 10.
Erastus Wolcott letter to Roger Newberry
Erastus Wolcott letter to Roger Newberry
A letter from Connecticut Brigadier General Erastus Wolcott to Colonel Roger Newberry informing him of an impending invasion by the British, followed by orders to Newberry to select a group of men to be at the ready. Below Wolcott's signature are orders issued by Col. Newberry to the 1st Regiment, Connecticut militia, to form new companies. He ordered various captains, lieutenants and ensigns to command the companies and divisions in Hartford, Windsor, Suffield.
French and Indian War Collection, 1743 - 1763
French and Indian War Collection, 1743 - 1763
Although this collection consists primarily of materials created during the French and Indian War, there are in nearly every series some materials from the preceding King George's War. There are enlistments and impressments, muster rolls and account rolls of those serving in the war. Of interest are several contracts signed by men who served on the Louisbourg expedition in Cape Breton as well as in later campaigns, authorizing the transfer of their wages to another individual (often Jonathan Trumbull) to pay for provisions and to serve the recipients' speculative interests. There are also several receipts for wages paid by Trumbull. Numerous accounts and receipts provide information about how much money was spent on specific food items and alcohol, guns, blankets, and the shoeing horses. There are details of military orders; correspondence concerning intelligence (including concern over reports that the French were making snow shoes) and orders as well as letters to family. Finally, there are journals kept by men involved in the French and Indian War, an orderly book from Ticonderoga, and a note book with color sketches and examples of various styles of penmanship., French and Indian War Papers, 1743-1763, Connecticut Historical Society
George Washington Letters, 1776-1799
George Washington Letters, 1776-1799
A collection of letters and accounts, most of which have been signed by George Washington. Many of the letters were written to Col. Jeremiah Wadsworth, Commissary General for the Continental Army. Washington also wrote several times to Jonathan Trumbull, Governor of Connecticut, Connecticut Historical Society
Governor Thomas Fitch Papers
Governor Thomas Fitch Papers
Fitch was governor during the waning years of the French and Indian War, and many of his petitions and letters to the King and to the Lords of Trade relate to the expenses Connecticut incurred and his efforts to receive reimbursement. He also requested more arms to help protect New England's borders from the French and preserve the "rights and dominion" of Britain's North American colonies. Reports to the Lords of Trade and various secretaries to the King included the success of raising troops for an expedition against France in Canada, the colony's tax burdens, and the use of bounties and land grants to pay the soldiers. One document from the Earl of Egremont warned Fitch against disturbing the Shawnee and Delaware Indians by settling in the Susquehanna area. There were also references to Connecticut's Mohegan Case. Several accounts are among the papers, and a letter critical of Samson Occom is a unique and unusual find. Fitch was also noted for being the governor when Britain imposed the Stamp Tax. A grant from the National Historical Publications and Records Commission funded digitization of this collection., Governor Thomas Fitch Ppaers, 1755-1765, Connecticut Historical Society
Hartford News Daily scrapbook, 1939-1940
Hartford News Daily scrapbook, 1939-1940
Newspaper and magazine articles about the brain child of Bice Clemow to start a new newspaper in the city of Hartford. The Newsdailies Inc. was incorporated December 1, 1939. Clemow believed he could edit a newspaper more effectively by rewriting and condensing both local and wire news, and print it more cheaply using lithography. The paper was to be a tabloid, and was located at 111 Park Street in the city. The name of the publication was called The Hartford News Daily., Historic/Current Address: 111 Park Street, Hartford, Connecticut
John Talcott Account Book, 1635-1742
John Talcott Account Book, 1635-1742
This record book is attributed to John Talcott (the second) of Hartford, Connecticut, and used by his son-in-law, Joseph Wadsworth (known for his involvement hiding the Connecticut Charter). Contains family history, including Wadsworth vital records, and copies of legal documents. Among the legal documents are the Laws of Massachusetts Territory (1687) and several proclamations by King Charles. The October 1-4, 1683, issue of The London Gazette had been sewn into the volume along with "His Majesties Declaration" dated July 1683. These were removed and stored separately after conservation. The accounts include brick making, along with other standard sales and purchases. Funds to conserve and digitize this account book were generously donated by members of the Talcott family and friends.
John Trumbull (artist) Papers
John Trumbull (artist) Papers
This John Trumbull was a noted artist. The collection consists predominantly of correspondence of Lebanon, Connecticut, born Trumbull with family members and other individuals. The letters are largely of a personal nature, particularly those to his family, but many are concerned with his work as an artist. The collection also includes financial records, containing a receipt book for prints of The Declaration of Independence and his accounts with Hartford Bank. A grant from the National Historical Publications and Records Commission funded digitization of this collection., John Trumbull Papers, 1769-1843, Connecticut Historical Society
John Trumbull (poet) Papers
John Trumbull (poet) Papers
This John Trumbull was a poet. The collection consists of a handwritten book about navigation that includes a mock journal of a trip from London to Madeira kept by John Mills in 1795, poems by Trumbull, letters signed by Trumbull, and accounts. One of the letters was written to Daniel Wadsworth. A grant from the National Historical Publications and Records Commission funded digitization of this collection., John Trumbull Papers, 1784-1827, Connecticut Historical Society
John Whittelsey account book, 1688-1706
John Whittelsey account book, 1688-1706
Accounts kept by a shoemaker of Saybrook, Connecticut, written on pages bound into Tulley's Almanack of 1690 published in Boston by Samuel Green.
Jonathan Trumbull, Jr. Papers, 1753-1832
Jonathan Trumbull, Jr. Papers, 1753-1832
A collection of papers of Jonathan Trumbull, Jr. of Lebanon, Connecticut, a businessman, politician, first Comptroller of the U.S. Treasury, secretary to George Washington, Paymaster for the New York department during the Revolution, and Governor of Connecticut. He served in the Connecticut General Assembly, the House of Representatives, the United States Senate, Lieutenant Governor of Connecticut and finally Governor. Documents in the collection include personal and business correspondence with many notable individuals of the time, militia records including courts martial and military returns, his personal estate papers, and records of the votes of Connecticut towns on the controversial Embargo of 1809. Digitization of this collection was funded by a grant from the National Historical Publications and Records Commission. Note that some documents were filmed while bound in oversize volumes and hence some text will be obscured., Connecticut Historical Society
Joseph Trumbull Papers
Joseph Trumbull Papers
The collection consists largely of correspondence and supporting material written in Trumbull's personal and official roles. The correspondence is predominantly from the period of the American Revolution. There are also a few folders of receipts, bills, and accounts, including one folder of receipts from Joshua Smith. Some notable correspondents include Eleazer Fitch, Jonathan Trumbull, Jr., Eliphalet Dyer, Charles Miller, Christopher Leffingwell, Alexander Hamilton, Elisha Avery, Oliver Phelps, and John Hancock. A grant from the National Historical Publications and Records Commission funded digitization of this collection.
Letters of Joseph O. Cross, 1864-1865
Letters of Joseph O. Cross, 1864-1865
Letters from Joseph O. Cross, with the 29th Regiment of Connecticut Volunteers (Colored), to his wife Abby Jane Simons Cross of Griswold, Connecticut. He wrote about other men in his unit that came from Griswold and how they fared, he commented that his own health was generally good, and complained that he had not yet been paid. He expressed concern for his family as they were also short of cash and sent greetings to his extended family and friends in Griswold. There are only a few letters in which he mentions battles.
Meriden Design Archive
Meriden Design Archive
A selection of catalogs of goods manufactured in Meriden, Connecticut, in the late 19th and early 20th centuries by such companies as Meriden Britannia Company, Handel Company, International Silver Company, and Bradley & Hubbard Manufacturing Company., Connecticut Historical Society
Miss Jacobs with sunflowers
Miss Jacobs with sunflowers
Color film taken from the southeast corner of 70 Terry Road, Hartford, toward the garden, featuring three large sunflower plants and details of the flowers with Editha Jacobs. Ward S. Jacobs is then filmed wearing a jacket and hat and pushing a motor mower with three heads. The final twelve seconds of the film show a sail boat tacking on a lake.
Nathaniel Terry letter to George Cabot
Nathaniel Terry letter to George Cabot
A letter to Massachusetts politician George Cabot to extend an invitation to members of the New England Convention to join the citizens of Hartford at Bennet's Hotel for a public dinner. Terry was serving on the Committee of Arrangements for the event.
Newgate Prison
Newgate Prison
Visual representations and manuscript material related to the Newgate Prison, a former copper mine located in present day East Granby, Connecticut. Mining began as early as 1705, and between 1776-1782 the structure and tunnels were used to house prisoners of war during the American Revolution. Today it is a historic house managed by the State of Connecticut., Connecticut Historical Society
Noah Webster Papers
Noah Webster Papers
Correspondence to and from Noah Webster, a West Hartford and New Haven, Connecticut, lexicographer and dictionary publisher, and the later correspondence of his executor William W. Ellsworth about the settlement of Webster's estate and the conflict concerning ownership of copyright. Among the publishers Webster corresponded with were Nathaniel D. Appleton, Ephraim Morgan, B.B. Mussey, E.P. Walton & Sons, N.&J. White, G.&C. Merriam, and E.&L. Merriam. Of particular interest is a draft page from the etymology Webster was compiling., Noah Webster Collection, 1808-1894, Ms Webster. Connecticut Historical Society, Hartford, Conn., Connecticut Historical Society
Notes on William T. Sherman's Speech
Notes on William T. Sherman's Speech
Text of a speech written or given by William T. Sherman. The text has been edited, refers to Sherman in the third person in a few places, and is written on the letterhead of William H. Potter, insurance agent in Mystic, Connecticut. The address was delivered at a celebration held at Fort Griswold, and Sherman unequivocally stated that he had been promised he would not have to speak. His topics included his ancestor Taylor Sherman of Fairfield County, Connecticut, the wars with the Indians, General Custer's defeat at the hands of Indians, and in general decried the savagery of American Indians against white settlers.
Oliver Wolcott Jr. Papers
Oliver Wolcott Jr. Papers
The collection consists of correspondence (personal and business), federal and state government papers, legal documents, financial papers, business papers (including his papers relating to the China trade, 1805-1814), speeches and essays, awards and appointments, notes on Wolcott family history, estate papers, and related print material. Notable correspondents include John Adams, John Quincy Adams, Fisher Ames, Joel Barlow, Theodore Dwight, Chauncey Goodrich, Alexander Hamilton, Rufus King, Timothy Pickering, Josiah Quincy, Benjamin Tallmadge, Noah Webster, George Washington, and Oliver Wolcott. Included in the collection are the notes of George Gibbs IV for his two volumes Memoirs of the Administrations of Washington and John Adams, Edited from the Papers of Oliver Wolcott, Secretary of the Treasury, 1846. A grant from the National Historical Publications and Records Commission funded digitization of this collection., Connecticut Historical Society
Oliver Wolcott Sr. Papers
Oliver Wolcott Sr. Papers
Personal, military and political correspondence of Oliver Wolcott, Sr., a representative to the Continental Congress, signer of the Declaration of Independence, judge, General in the Revolution, Indian Commissioner, and Governor of Connecticut. Also includes legal papers, legislative documents, and biographical sketches of Henry and Oliver Wolcott written by Oliver Wolcott Jr. A grant from the National Historical Publications and Records Commission funded digitization of this collection., Connecticut Historical Society
Report to the Tolland County Agricultural Society
Report to the Tolland County Agricultural Society
A report from the Committee on Sheep and Swine to the Society listing the winners of prizes for best wooled ewes, best mutton, best wooled buck, best boar, best sow, and second place winners in each of those categories. S. B. Daggett was chairman of the committee.

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