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10th tee, Keney Park golf course, Hartford, Memorial Day
View of a woman lining of a shot on the tenth tee of the Keney Park golf course. Another woman can be seen behind her, also holding a golf club. Men and women are visible, some standing and some sitting on benches., Environment, Infrastructure, HHC IMLS Keney Park, The first nine holes of the golf course were finished in 1927, and the remaining holes in 1930. Designed by the firm founded by Frederick Law Olmsted, and encompassing the Ten Mile Woods the famed landscape architect knew as a boy, Keney Park is the largest park in Hartford, constituting 584 acres in the north end of the city and an additional 110 acres in Windsor. The bulk of the land was a gift from Henry Keney, whose family had a grocery business at the corner of Main Street and Albany Avenue. The park opened in 1896, entrusted to a group of trustees. It was turned over to the city in 1924.
1103-1150 Main Street, Hartford
View of storefronts at 1103-1150 Main Street, Hartford. Signage above the storefront of 1148 Main reads "C.H. BRAZEL". Pedestrians and cars can be seen in the background., Infrastructure, Livelihood, HHC glass plate negatives, The 1920 city directory lists Chas. Brazil as a harness maker at 1148 Main. Examination of another image shows the business as located in part of the ground floor of Sigourney House.
1130 Main Street, Hartford, Pierce's Steam Laundry
View of commercial buildings on Main Street, including Pierce's Steam Laundry at 1130 Main. Signage partially visible in the upper right foreground indicates a livery and horse-shoeing business. Cars and pedestrians can be seen in the background., Infrastructure, Livelihood, HHC glass plate negatives, The company is listed as located at 237 Hamilton Street (Hamilton and Bartholomew) in the 1920 city directory.
391-407 Main Street at Capitol Avenue, Hartford, looking west
View of commercial buildings at 391-407 Main Street, looking west at the intersection with Capitol Avenue. Charles L. Hubbard pharmacy can be seen on the corner to the right., Infrastructure, Livelihood, HHC glass plate negatives
4th green, Keney Park golf course, Hartford
View of the fourth green of the Keney Park golf course., Lifestyle, Infrastructure, HHC IMLS Keney Park, The first nine holes of the golf course were finished in 1927, and the remaining holes in 1930. Designed by the firm founded by Frederick Law Olmsted, and encompassing the Ten Mile Woods the famed landscape architect knew as a boy, Keney Park is the largest park in Hartford, constituting 584 acres in the north end of the city and an additional 110 acres in Windsor. The bulk of the land was a gift from Henry Keney, whose family had a grocery business at the corner of Main Street and Albany Avenue. The park opened in 1896, entrusted to a group of trustees. It was turned over to the city in 1924.
52 Asylum Street, Hartford, October 24, 1917
View of businesses at or near 52 Asylum Street, Hartford. Andrus and Naedele Co. can be seen to the right. A car is parked in front of the storefront to the left., Infrastructure, Livelihood, HHC glass plate negatives
66-74 Asylum Street, Hartford, October 24, 1917
View of buildings at 66-74 Asylum Street. A bank is partially visible to the left. At the end of an alley at center signs indicate the Burnham hat business., Infrastructure, Livelihood, HHC glass plate negatives
6th green, Keney Park golf course, Hartford, August 1927
View of the sixth green of the Keney Park golf course. A man is visible in the distance. Inscribed at lower left: "Keney Park/golf course/aug. 1927"., Environment, Infrastructure, HHC IMLS Keney Park, Information printed on back of image indicates that the hole measures 166 yards from one of the trees to the man standing. Designed by the firm founded by Frederick Law Olmsted, and encompassing the Ten Mile Woods the famed landscape architect knew as a boy, Keney Park is the largest park in Hartford, constituting 584 acres in the north end of the city and an additional 110 acres in Windsor. The bulk of the land was a gift from Henry Keney, whose family had a grocery business at the corner of Main Street and Albany Avenue. The park opened in 1896, entrusted to a group of trustees. It was turned over to the city in 1924.
7th fairway of golf course, Keney Park, Hartford
View of the seventh fairway of the keney Park golf course., Lifestyle, Infrastructure, HHC IMLS Keney Park, The first nine holes of the golf course were finished in 1927, and the remaining holes in 1930. Designed by the firm founded by Frederick Law Olmsted, and encompassing the Ten Mile Woods the famed landscape architect knew as a boy, Keney Park is the largest park in Hartford, constituting 584 acres in the north end of the city and an additional 110 acres in Windsor. The bulk of the land was a gift from Henry Keney, whose family had a grocery business at the corner of Main Street and Albany Avenue. The park opened in 1896, entrusted to a group of trustees. It was turned over to the city in 1924.
8th green, Keney Park golf course, Hartford
View of the 8th green of the Keney Park golf course., Environment, Infrastructure, Lifestyle, HHC IMLS Keney Park, Information printed on back of image: "Pitch made from fairway at the left". The first nine holes of the golf course were finished in 1927, and the remaining holes in 1930. Designed by the firm founded by Frederick Law Olmsted, and encompassing the Ten Mile Woods the famed landscape architect knew as a boy, Keney Park is the largest park in Hartford, constituting 584 acres in the north end of the city and an additional 110 acres in Windsor. The bulk of the land was a gift from Henry Keney, whose family had a grocery business at the corner of Main Street and Albany Avenue. The park opened in 1896, entrusted to a group of trustees. It was turned over to the city in 1924.
9th green, Keney Park golf course, Hartford
View of the ninth green of the keney Park golf course., Lifestyle, Infrastructure, HHC IMLS Keney Park, The first nine holes of the golf course were finished in 1927, and the remaining holes in 1930. Designed by the firm founded by Frederick Law Olmsted, and encompassing the Ten Mile Woods the famed landscape architect knew as a boy, Keney Park is the largest park in Hartford, constituting 584 acres in the north end of the city and an additional 110 acres in Windsor. The bulk of the land was a gift from Henry Keney, whose family had a grocery business at the corner of Main Street and Albany Avenue. The park opened in 1896, entrusted to a group of trustees. It was turned over to the city in 1924.
Abbott Ball Co., Hartford
View of an industrial building next to railroad tracks. Signage above the building identifies it as Abbott Ball Co., manufacturer of steel balls., Infrastructure, Livelihood, HHC glass plate negatives, The company is listed as located in Elmwood in the 1920 city directory.
Abraham , Isaac and the Angel
Drawing by Elbert Weinberg depicting the biblical story of the Sacrifice of Isaac. The boy Isaac crouches at the right. His father Abraham kneels beside him holding a knife. At the left stands an angel, who bends over and seizes the right hand of Abraham with both hands. The drawing is signed “E. WEINBERG 1964.”According to the account in Genesis, the first book of the Bible, God instructed Abraham to sacrifice his only son Isaac. As Abraham raised his knife to kill the boy, an angel appeared and told him not to harm him. Weinberg made several sculptures depicting this subject., Sculptor Elbert Weinberg (1928-1991) was a Hartford native and Weaver High School graduate who maintained a studio in the Colt Building for many years. He worked in various mediums, including marble, bronze, and other metals. Twice awarded the prestigious Prix de Rome, Weinberg created sculptures that grace museums, public installations, and private collections throughout the United States and Europe.
Abraham and Isaac
Detail of a bronze sculpture by Elbert Weinberg depicting the biblical story of the Sacrifice of Isaac. An elderly bearded man holds a nude boy in his arms. According to the account in Genesis, the first book of the Bible, God instructed Abraham to sacrifice his only son Isaac. As Abraham raised his knife to kill the boy, an angel appeared and told him not to harm him. Weinberg made drawings, prints, and sculptures of this subject throughout his career. The date of this statue is not known, though it is likely to be relatively early, perhaps dating to the 1960s. The photograph was probably taken in the early 1990s following the death of the sculptor., Sculptor Elbert Weinberg (1928-1991) was a Hartford native and Weaver High School graduate who maintained a studio in the Colt Building for many years. He worked in various mediums, including marble, bronze, and other metals. Twice awarded the prestigious Prix de Rome, Weinberg created sculptures that grace museums, public installations, and private collections throughout the United States and Europe.
Abraham and Isaac
Drawing by Elbert Weinberg depicting the biblical patriarch Abraham and his young son Isaac. Abraham is standing supporting the nude figure of Isaac. Abraham has a beard, is barefoot, and is wearing long robes. The drawing probably alludes to the biblical story of the Sacrifice of Isaac. According to the account in Genesis, the first book of the Bible, God instructed Abraham to sacrifice his only son Isaac. As Abraham raised his knife to kill the boy, an angel appeared and told him not to harm him. The drawing is signed and dated “E. Weinberg 1954.”, Sculptor Elbert Weinberg (1928-1991) was a Hartford native and Weaver High School graduate who maintained a studio in the Colt Building for many years. He worked in various mediums, including marble, bronze, and other metals. Twice awarded the prestigious Prix de Rome, Weinberg created sculptures that grace museums, public installations, and private collections throughout the United States and Europe.
Abraham and Isaac
Drawing by Elbert Weinberg depicting the biblical patriarch Abraham and his young son Isaac. Abraham has a beard and is wearing a heavy robe over his head. The boy Isaac has short curly hair. The drawing probably alludes to the biblical story of the Sacrifice of Isaac. According to the account in Genesis, the first book of the Bible, God instructed Abraham to sacrifice his only son Isaac. As Abraham raised his knife to kill the boy, an angel appeared and told him not to harm him. The drawing is signed and dated “WEINBERG ’62.” It served as the basis for a 1969 lithograph, which, in turn was used on a gift acknowledgement card by the Greater Hartford Jewish Community Center in 1986., Sculptor Elbert Weinberg (1928-1991) was a Hartford native and Weaver High School graduate who maintained a studio in the Colt Building for many years. He worked in various mediums, including marble, bronze, and other metals. Twice awarded the prestigious Prix de Rome, Weinberg created sculptures that grace museums, public installations, and private collections throughout the United States and Europe.
Abraham and Isaac
Drawing by Elbert Weinberg depicting the biblical patriarch Abraham holding his young son Isaac in his arms. Abraham has a beard and is wearing a heavy robe over his head. The boy Isaac is nude. The drawing probably alludes to the biblical story of the Sacrifice of Isaac. According to the account in Genesis, the first book of the Bible, God instructed Abraham to sacrifice his only son Isaac. As Abraham raised his knife to kill the boy, an angel appeared and told him not to harm him. The date of the drawing is unknown, but it appears to be early, possibly from the 1950s., Sculptor Elbert Weinberg (1928-1991) was a Hartford native and Weaver High School graduate who maintained a studio in the Colt Building for many years. He worked in various mediums, including marble, bronze, and other metals. Twice awarded the prestigious Prix de Rome, Weinberg created sculptures that grace museums, public installations, and private collections throughout the United States and Europe.
Abraham and Isaac
Drawing by Elbert Weinberg depicting the biblical patriarch Abraham and his young son Isaac. Abraham is standing with outstretched hands in front of his small son Isaac. Abraham has a beard, is barefoot, and is wearing a short tunic. Isaac is nude. His hands are bound. The drawing alludes to the biblical story of the Sacrifice of Isaac. According to the account in Genesis, the first book of the Bible, God instructed Abraham to sacrifice his only son Isaac. As Abraham raised his knife to kill the boy, an angel appeared and told him not to harm him. The drawing is signed and dated “Elbert Weinberg 1952.”, Sculptor Elbert Weinberg (1928-1991) was a Hartford native and Weaver High School graduate who maintained a studio in the Colt Building for many years. He worked in various mediums, including marble, bronze, and other metals. Twice awarded the prestigious Prix de Rome, Weinberg created sculptures that grace museums, public installations, and private collections throughout the United States and Europe.
Abraham and Isaac
Oblique view of a bronze sculpture by Elbert Weinberg depicting the biblical story of the Sacrifice of Isaac. An elderly man wearing long robes is standing, holding a nude boy in his arms. According to the account in Genesis, the first book of the Bible, God instructed Abraham to sacrifice his only son Isaac. As Abraham raised his knife to kill the boy, an angel appeared and told him not to harm him. Weinberg made drawings, prints, and sculptures of this subject throughout his career. The date of this statue is not known, though it is likely to be relatively early, perhaps dating to the 1960s. The photograph was probably taken in the early 1990s following the death of the sculptor., Sculptor Elbert Weinberg (1928-1991) was a Hartford native and Weaver High School graduate who maintained a studio in the Colt Building for many years. He worked in various mediums, including marble, bronze, and other metals. Twice awarded the prestigious Prix de Rome, Weinberg created sculptures that grace museums, public installations, and private collections throughout the United States and Europe.
Abraham and Isaac (linoleum cut)
Color linoleum cut by Elbert Weinberg depicting the biblical story of the Sacrifice of Isaac. Two male figures stand facing each other in a rocky landscape. The man at the left leans on his staff. The man at the right rests one hand on the neck of a donkey or mule and gesticulates with the other. An animal on a mountaintop in the background appears to be a stag or a mountain sheep. The print is inscribed “ABRAHAM AND ISAAC 1/20” and signed “ELBERT WEINBERG.” According to the account in Genesis, the first book of the Bible, God instructed Abraham to sacrifice his only son Isaac. As Abraham raised his knife to kill the boy, an angel appeared and told him not to harm him, producing a ram to be sacrificed instead. Weinberg depicted the subject in drawings, prints, and sculptures throughout his career. The Elbert Weinberg Collection in the Hartford History Center at the Hartford Public Library includes the original linoleum blocks for this print and a series of progressive proofs taken from the blocks. While most impressions appear to have been printed in pink, green, and black, this impression is a variant, printed in gray and black., Sculptor Elbert Weinberg (1928-1991) was a Hartford native and Weaver High School graduate who maintained a studio in the Colt Building for many years. He worked in various mediums, including marble, bronze, and other metals. Twice awarded the prestigious Prix de Rome, Weinberg created sculptures that grace museums, public installations, and private collections throughout the United States and Europe.
Abraham and Isaac (linoleum cut)
Color linoleum cut by Elbert Weinberg depicting the biblical story of the Sacrifice of Isaac. Two male figures stand facing each other in a rocky landscape. The man at the left leans on his staff. The man at the right rests one hand on the neck of a donkey or mule and gesticulates with the other. An animal on a mountaintop in the background appears to be a stag or a mountain sheep. The print is inscribed “ABRAHAM AND ISAAC 1/20” and signed “ELBERT WEINBERG.” According to the account in Genesis, the first book of the Bible, God instructed Abraham to sacrifice his only son Isaac. As Abraham raised his knife to kill the boy, an angel appeared and told him not to harm him, producing a ram to be sacrificed instead. Weinberg depicted the subject in drawings, prints, and sculptures throughout his career. The Elbert Weinberg Collection in the Hartford History Center at the Hartford Public Library includes the original linoleum blocks for this print and a series of progressive proofs taken from the blocks., Sculptor Elbert Weinberg (1928-1991) was a Hartford native and Weaver High School graduate who maintained a studio in the Colt Building for many years. He worked in various mediums, including marble, bronze, and other metals. Twice awarded the prestigious Prix de Rome, Weinberg created sculptures that grace museums, public installations, and private collections throughout the United States and Europe.
Abraham and Isaac (lithograph)
Lithograph by Elbert Weinberg depicting the head and shoulders of an elderly man with a beard and the head of a boy who stands in front of him. The print is inscribed “HERE AM I [Hebrew characters] ABRAHAM AND ISAAC.” According to the account in Genesis, the first book of the Bible, God instructed Abraham to sacrifice his only son Isaac. As Abraham raised his knife to kill the boy, an angel appeared and told him not to harm him. The print was reproduced on a fund-raising brochure for the Greater Hartford Jewish Community Center in 1986. The caption on the brochure identifies the print as an “Original lithograph, 1969, by Elbert Weinberg.”, Sculptor Elbert Weinberg (1928-1991) was a Hartford native and Weaver High School graduate who maintained a studio in the Colt Building for many years. He worked in various mediums, including marble, bronze, and other metals. Twice awarded the prestigious Prix de Rome, Weinberg created sculptures that grace museums, public installations, and private collections throughout the United States and Europe.
Abraham and Isaac (preliminary drawing)
Drawing by Elbert Weinberg depicting the biblical story of the Sacrifice of Isaac. Two male figures stand facing each other in a rocky landscape. The man at the right leans on his staff. The man at the left rests one hand on the neck of an animal and gesticulates with the other. An animal is on a mountaintop in the background. According to the account in Genesis, the first book of the Bible, God instructed Abraham to sacrifice his only son Isaac. As Abraham raised his knife to kill the boy, an angel appeared and told him not to harm him, producing a ram to be sacrificed instead. Weinberg depicted the subject in drawings, prints, and sculptures throughout his career. This drawing is very closely related to a color linoleum cut that probably dates from the 1980s. The Elbert Weinberg Collection in the Hartford History Center at the Hartford Public Library includes the original linoleum blocks for this print and a series of progressive proofs taken from the blocks. The drawing is in Sketchbook No. 12, folio 53r. The inside front cover of the sketchbook is inscribed “ELBERT WEINBERG / 427 CHURCH ST. APT. 208 / HARTFORD, CONN.”, Sculptor Elbert Weinberg (1928-1991) was a Hartford native and Weaver High School graduate who maintained a studio in the Colt Building for many years. He worked in various mediums, including marble, bronze, and other metals. Twice awarded the prestigious Prix de Rome, Weinberg created sculptures that grace museums, public installations, and private collections throughout the United States and Europe.
Abraham and Isaac (printing block)
One of several printing blocks used to produce Abraham and Isaac, a color relief print by Elbert Weinberg. This block was used for printing the background and was printed in gray. The figures of Abraham and Isaac can be faintly discerned in the upper part of the block. According to the account in Genesis, the first book of the Bible, God instructed Abraham to sacrifice his only son Isaac. As Abraham raised his knife to kill the boy, an angel appeared and told him not to harm him, producing a ram to be sacrificed instead. Weinberg depicted the subject in drawings, prints, and sculptures throughout his career., Sculptor Elbert Weinberg (1928-1991) was a Hartford native and Weaver High School graduate who maintained a studio in the Colt Building for many years. He worked in various mediums, including marble, bronze, and other metals. Twice awarded the prestigious Prix de Rome, Weinberg created sculptures that grace museums, public installations, and private collections throughout the United States and Europe.
Abraham and Isaac (printing block)
One of several printing blocks used to produce Abraham and Isaac, a color relief print by Elbert Weinberg. Two male figures stand facing each other in a rocky landscape. The man at the right leans on his staff. The man at the left rests one hand on the neck of a donkey or mule and gesticulates with the other. An animal is on a mountaintop in the background The black key block was printed on the surface of this block to serve as a guide for the placement of the color shapes, which were cut from cardboard and glued to the backing. This block was used to print the color blue green. According to the account in Genesis, the first book of the Bible, God instructed Abraham to sacrifice his only son Isaac. As Abraham raised his knife to kill the boy, an angel appeared and told him not to harm him, producing a ram to be sacrificed instead. Weinberg depicted the subject in drawings, prints, and sculptures throughout his career., Sculptor Elbert Weinberg (1928-1991) was a Hartford native and Weaver High School graduate who maintained a studio in the Colt Building for many years. He worked in various mediums, including marble, bronze, and other metals. Twice awarded the prestigious Prix de Rome, Weinberg created sculptures that grace museums, public installations, and private collections throughout the United States and Europe.
Abraham and Isaac (printing block)
One of several printing blocks used to produce Abraham and Isaac, a color relief print by Elbert Weinberg. This block was the key block, which was printed in black. It shows two male figures facing each other in a rocky landscape. The man at the right leans on his staff. The man at the left rests one hand on the neck of a donkey or mule and gesticulates with the other. An animal on a mountaintop in the background appears to be a stag or a mountain sheep. According to the account in Genesis, the first book of the Bible, God instructed Abraham to sacrifice his only son Isaac. As Abraham raised his knife to kill the boy, an angel appeared and told him not to harm him, producing a ram to be sacrificed instead. Weinberg depicted the subject in drawings, prints, and sculptures throughout his career., Sculptor Elbert Weinberg (1928-1991) was a Hartford native and Weaver High School graduate who maintained a studio in the Colt Building for many years. He worked in various mediums, including marble, bronze, and other metals. Twice awarded the prestigious Prix de Rome, Weinberg created sculptures that grace museums, public installations, and private collections throughout the United States and Europe.
Abraham, Isaac and the Angel
Drawing by Elbert Weinberg depicting the biblical story of the Sacrifice of Isaac. According to the account in Genesis, the first book of the Bible, God instructed Abraham to sacrifice his only son Isaac. As Abraham raised his knife to kill the boy, an angel appeared and told him not to harm him. In the drawing, Abraham kneels, holding a knife over the boy Isaac, who crouches on the ground. The angel swoops down from above and seizes the hand of Abraham. The drawing is signed “WEINBERG 1959.” It is inscribed on the back “Abraham Isaac & Angel #3 / 1959 INK”, Sculptor Elbert Weinberg (1928-1991) was a Hartford native and Weaver High School graduate who maintained a studio in the Colt Building for many years. He worked in various mediums, including marble, bronze, and other metals. Twice awarded the prestigious Prix de Rome, Weinberg created sculptures that grace museums, public installations, and private collections throughout the United States and Europe.
Abraham, Isaac and the Angel (drawing)
Drawing by Elbert Weinberg depicting the biblical story of the Sacrifice of Isaac. Abraham, an elderly bearded man, holds his naked son Isaac. An angel towers behind them with outstretched wings, gesturing towards a ram at the right. The drawing is signed “E. Weinberg.” According to the account in Genesis, the first book of the Bible, God instructed Abraham to sacrifice his only son Isaac. As Abraham raised his knife to kill the boy, an angel appeared and told him not to harm him, producing a ram to be sacrificed instead. The date of the drawing is not known, but is probably early, possibly dating to the 1950s., Sculptor Elbert Weinberg (1928-1991) was a Hartford native and Weaver High School graduate who maintained a studio in the Colt Building for many years. He worked in various mediums, including marble, bronze, and other metals. Twice awarded the prestigious Prix de Rome, Weinberg created sculptures that grace museums, public installations, and private collections throughout the United States and Europe.
Abraham, Isaac and the Angel (drawing)
Drawing by Elbert Weinberg depicting the biblical story of the Sacrifice of Isaac. A tall nude angel at the left, towers over the figures of Abraham, the bearded man in the center, and the naked boy, Isaac, who stands in front of his father with his hands bound. The drawing is signed “Elbert Weinberg.” According to the account in Genesis, the first book of the Bible, God instructed Abraham to sacrifice his only son Isaac. As Abraham raised his knife to kill the boy, an angel appeared and told him not to harm him, producing a ram to be sacrificed instead. The date of the drawing is not known, but it probably early, possibly dating to the 1950s., Sculptor Elbert Weinberg (1928-1991) was a Hartford native and Weaver High School graduate who maintained a studio in the Colt Building for many years. He worked in various mediums, including marble, bronze, and other metals. Twice awarded the prestigious Prix de Rome, Weinberg created sculptures that grace museums, public installations, and private collections throughout the United States and Europe.
Abraham, Isaac and the Angel, No. 1
Oblique view of a 1960 bronze sculpture by Elbert Weinberg depicting the biblical story of the Sacrifice of Isaac. According to the account in Genesis, the first book of the Bible, God instructed Abraham to sacrifice his only son Isaac. As Abraham raised his knife to kill the boy, an angel appeared and told him not to harm him. In the sculpture, Abraham kneels at the left, Isaac lies on the ground, and the angel swoops down from above. The statuette is eighteen inches high and was exhibited at the Art Institute of Chicago in1961, the Grace Borgenicht Gallery in New York in 1962, and the Jewish Museum in New York in 1985. The photograph bears the stamp of the Grace Borgenicht Gallery, Weinberg's New York dealer., Sculptor Elbert Weinberg (1928-1991) was a Hartford native and Weaver High School graduate who maintained a studio in the Colt Building for many years. He worked in various mediums, including marble, bronze, and other metals. Twice awarded the prestigious Prix de Rome, Weinberg created sculptures that grace museums, public installations, and private collections throughout the United States and Europe.

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